Leo Laksi’s Bangkok And Back

Nothing Ventured, Nothing Gained

Nikon D700 and Nikkor 14-24mm f/2.8 zoom lens – bokeh in Japan

with 2 comments

Kobe graffiti corner

Kobe graffiti corner

Several weeks ago I picked up the highly acclaimed Nikkor 14-24mm f/2.8 zoom lens.  On a full frame camera like the Nikon D700, the wide angle junkie can attain Nirvana for its field of view (fov) in a non-fisheye lens.  Now sometimes, amateur photographers think of ultra wide angles (UWA) and landscapes in the same breath.  However, UWAs are very useful in shooting photographs where the subject is closer, such as in this series of photographs recently shot in Kobe, Japan.

This lens is considered the reference standard for wide angle zooms.  And for good reason.  The resolution is phenomenal with a sharpness in image that almost unmatched.  Edge to edge image quality at a f-stop of 11 is quite sharp.  However, at wide open or near wide open, the lens yields bokeh that is pleasing.  These photos were shot at focal lengths from 14 to 24mm.

Downside?  The lens is huge, with a bulbous front element, for which there is no filter.

Photos shown are uncropped and  taken with a Nikon D700 and Nikkor 14-24mm f/2.8 zoom lens.

Closer is interesting

Closer can be interesting

What to eat

What to eat

Looking from the outside

Looking from the outside

Flowers with bokeh

Flowers with bokeh

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Written by leolaksi

June 3, 2009 at 6:20 am

2 Responses

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  1. You lucky bastard.

    iheartfilm

    June 3, 2009 at 6:45 am

    • BION, I’m downsizing my gear. Using D700 with UWA and telehoto shots. M8 in between. As you know, only downside to the DSLR is size. Leo

      leolaksi

      June 3, 2009 at 6:58 am


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