Leo Laksi’s Bangkok And Back

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Posts Tagged ‘Lowe Pro

Two Billingham Hadleys in comparison – Hadley Pro v. Hadley (small)

with 21 comments

billinghamblackovertanfront

Recently I was asked about the size difference between these two Billingham bags.  The tan Hadley Pro is large enough to hold a Canon 5D with 17-40mm f/4 L and a 70-200mm f/2.8 L lenses.  As the 70-200mm is a large lens, both length and diameter, it consumes all the extra room.  Optionally, the bag will hold a Canon 5D with attached 17-40mm f/4 lens, as well as two other lenses, a 24-105mm f/4 L and an 85mm f/1.8 lens.  The two front pockets will also hold your accessories.   See my two previous postings on this subject.  Here or here.

billinghamblackovertan45

The small Hadley will hold a DLSR with attached lens and one other small to medium sized lens, like the 24-105mm f/4 L lens.  And if you DSLR is on the small side like a Canon 450D, you have a little more room.  See my other posting about the small Hadley.

billinghamontable

Comfortwise, I find the small Hadley one of the most comfortable bags I have.  I can carry this bag all day and never notice any discomfort.  On the other hand, I don’t find the Hadley Pro comfortable at all.  Perhaps it had to do with the overall stiffness of the bag with insert in place.  It’s not one of my favorite bags and I usually use the Crumpler “seven million dollar home” or the Lowe Pro Inverse 200 AW if there’s a need to carry a larger bag.  The Hadley Pro stays at home.

Removable inserts

Removable inserts

Both Hadleys are versatile.  Their inserts remove and you can use the bags in other ways.  The Hadley Pro can be used as a daily work bag and will hold an A4 sheet of paper,  even with the insert in place, you can place A4 size docs in the space behind the insert.  Also, the snap shown in the above photo creates a divided area in the space in front of the insert.

Quality-wise, both bags are extremely well-made and can be expected to last a lifetime.  The leather trim also adds to the appearance of the beautiful canvas material.

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Written by leolaksi

March 8, 2009 at 7:50 am

Lowe Pro SlingShot 200 AW camera backpack

with 3 comments

Rear view

Rear view

First of all, Lowe Pro makes some very good gear.  I’ve had a number of different bags of all configerations over the years.  Currently, I frequently use their fanny pack quasi-shoulder bag, the Inverse 200 AW.  This particular bag is a toploader and is great to shoot out of.  From my shoulder, I can move the bag from my back or side to a front position where I can use its broad mouth to change lenses without the worry of dropping the lens or worse, the camera.

On the other hand, the SlingShot 200 AW is a single strap shoulder/backpack.  There is also a smaller secondary strap that you fasten across your chest to secure the pack squarely on your back.  This part works, but requires that you always keep this smaller strap fastened.  It is somewhat comfortable.

The main compartment is a side loader, that is, it unzips the side and the back in a u-shaped pattern that if fully opened, opens 1/2 of the pack.  There is also a smaller compartment on top that is suitable for your wallet, camera accessories and odds/ends.  the third pocket is an organizer that is on the outside of the main compartment.

The pack can hold two DSLR bodies and two lenses, possibly three.  This is shown in the photo below.  It easily swallows three Leica M-bodies and five lenses with room to spare.  And don’t forget the smaller upper compartment.  More gear can be stashed there.

Front straps

Front straps

I’ve had this pack for several months and used it regularly.  Sad to say, this bag doesn’t work for me.

First of all, without the second strap fastened across your chest, that is, just carrying the pack on your shoulder, the pack is not balanced.  It tends to hang away from your body so it is not comfortable to carry.

Second, the side entry main compartment is just a disaster waiting for happen.  The pack is easy to slide to your front sideways and open the compartment to access your camera.  You can shoot from the bag with little difficulty.  The problem lies in the lack of security this side entry provides your gear.  If you forget to completely zip the pack after use, the camera can fall out.  In the heat of street use,  some of the contents may fall out.  Instead of “focusing” on the shot itself, you have to devote some brainpower to remembering to zip up the bag.

Be careful

Be careful

Before buying this bag, I recommend that you try it out in the store.  My gear needs more of an idiot-free design and I’m afraid that this design does not work for me.   I would always worry about my gear ending up in the street, ot worse, in some river after falling out of my bag.

Wide open

Wide open

Written by leolaksi

December 28, 2008 at 6:39 am