Leo Laksi’s Bangkok And Back

Nothing Ventured, Nothing Gained

Posts Tagged ‘Stung Treng

Boats on the Mekong, Cambodia to Laos

with 4 comments

Sunrise from Don Kong Island.

Sunrise from Don Khong Island.

Life on the Mekong River in Cambodia and Laos hasn’t caught up with the 21st Century. Yet.  There is still a connection to quieter times, a slower pace of living, that belies the dramatic changes that will occur on the Mekong.  From China to southern Laos, there are plans for over a dozen dams that the authorities say will benefit all the people of the region.  They come up with a myriad of benefits, from cheaper electricity to reduced flooding.   In looking at this future, I have a hard time envisioning the simple life that exists there now.  I recommend that you visit this area before it’s all gone.

Photos taken with a Nikon D700 and Nikkor AFS 24-70mm f/2.8 zoom lens and a Nikon D300S and Nikkor AFS 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 zoom lens.

Vietnamese fisherman at Stung Treng, Cambodia.

Vietnamese fisherman at Stung Treng, Cambodia.

A smoke on the boat.

A smoke on the boat.

Time to board.

Time to board.

Lost in thought.

Lost in thought.


Advertisements

Written by leolaksi

August 1, 2010 at 9:34 pm

A worthwhile visit, a rural school in Cambodia. Part 2.

with 4 comments

Smiling student.

Smiling student.

One of the most rewarding things to do when you are in Cambodia has nothing to do with sightseeing at venues like Angkor Wat or visiting the Irawaddy dolphins at Kratie.  I recommend you take some time out of your busy days to visit a rural school and donate school supplies.  These students are not well to do and are always short of basic supplies like pencils, paper tablets and rulers.  For less than $50 US you can easily supply every student with these supplies. And you never know how you might be impacting these students.  For every child attending school, there is probably another that does not attend school for one reason or another and it is near impossible to make a difference in their lives.  At least with the children in school they are learning the basics although there is no telling where they may be in ten more years.  The five and six year olds in these photos may be working in the fields with their parents in another 6 or 7 years.

Photos were taken with a Nikon D700 and Nikkor AFS 24-70mm f/2.8 zoom lens or a Nikon D300s and Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 VRI zoom lens.

Three room school near Stung Treng.

Three room school near Stung Treng.

Using chalk and fiber boards.

Using chalk and fiber boards.

Big smile on small face.

Big smile on small face.

Interested girl.

Interested girl.

Written by leolaksi

June 20, 2010 at 8:15 pm

Rural Cambodian school near Steng Trung.

leave a comment »

Angel.

Angel.

One of the most fulfilling things one can do when visiting the rural areas of Cambodia is to set aside time to visit schools.  As some of the rural schools are extremely poor, you should think about buying school supplies to donate to the children.

This particular school, which is located south of Stung Treng, had no electricity, windows and other conveniences that we take for granted in other parts of the world.  In fact, the children had neither paper nor pencils.  Instead they were using planks of wood and chalk during class.   I purchased pencils, rulers and tablets for each of the 100 children in the three classes.  (And candy and cookies to please each student’s sweet tooth.)

The children were kindergartners to second graders and were extremely bright.  However as they were in a very poor rural area,  their future is a bit hazy.  Do what you can to help.  Not only will the children benefit, so will you.

Concentrating.

Concentrating.

What's the answer?

What's the answer?

Reciting the lesson.

Reciting the lesson.

Written by leolaksi

May 23, 2010 at 7:39 pm

Stung Treng, Cambodia jetty at dawn

leave a comment »

Late night dinner in Stung Treng.

Late night dinner in Stung Treng.

The trip from Phnom Penh to Stung Treng took around 9 hours instead of 7 hours due to an unexpected 30 kilometers through a construction zone and a flat tire in Kratie.   By the time we got there, it was nighttime.  After checking into the best hotel in town, we went for a bite to eat  at the above restaurant.  The food was quite good although a bit pricey when you consider where we were.  (In fact, I found the cost of the meals on this trip to be pricey.)

Afterwards, I went back to the room and quickly fell asleep quickly.

The next morning I awoke for a sunrise walk in the downtown area of Stung Treng.  As the town rests on the confluence of the Mekong River and the Se Kong River, water dominates views of the town.  I headed over to the jetty that extended into the river as there was plenty of activity dominated by people bringing produce and fish to merchants who bought the goods, presumably for the market that sat in the middle of downtown.

Cambodia is a very vibrant locale for color photos and the scene at the river accented that.  From the bright orange glow of the sunrise to the picturesque clothes worn by the people, the scenery jumped out.

Photos captured with Nikon D700 and D300s bodies and Nikkor AF 85mm f/1.4, AF TC 135mm f/2 and AFS 24-70mm f/2.8 lenses.

Jetty at sunrise.

Jetty at sunrise.

Morning commotion.

Morning commotion.

Buying vegetables.

Buying vegetables.

Riverside merchant.

Riverside merchant.

Counting money.

Counting money.

Written by leolaksi

March 7, 2010 at 7:00 pm

Setting the stage – traveling from Phnom Penh, Cambodia to Don Khong, Laos

with 2 comments

Prapheng Waterfall on the Mekong River

Prapheng Waterfall on the Mekong River.

The waterfalls and rapids across the countless streams of the Mekong River in Southern Laos are located in one of the richest and most bio-diverse areas in Asia.  And it is always under threat due to the hydroelectric potential of the Mekong.  Several dams have been built in China and in Laos and Cambodia, studies have been completed to determine the feasibility of dams in the Southern reaches of the river.

I believe its only a matter of decades before the Don Khong, Laos to Kratie, Cambodia stretch is dammed and therefore life as we know it on the river will be gone.

Typical river scene

Typical river scene.

I had been thinking about making this trip for several years but had only recently decided to make this trip happen.  This area, which is referred to as Siphandon (translated in Lao as 4,000 islands),  can be visited from one of two routes with the northern route from Ubon Rachathani, Thailand through Pakse, Laos being the easiest to make.  You can fly into “Ubon” from Bangkok and then arrange for car, van or bus to journey the rest of the way to Siphandon.  From Ubon, the journey is approximately 300 kilometers.  The highways from the Thai border are quite good in contrast to the roads along the southern route from Phnom Penh, Cambodia to Siphandon.

Sunrise on Don Khong

Sunrise on Don Khong.

As I find Cambodia one of the most enchanting places on Earth for photographs, I decided to take the 700 kilometer southern route.  Through the towns of Kratie, with its endangered Iriwaddy dolphins, to the northern wetlands capital, Stung Trung.  Along the way, there are so many opportunities for photographs that one is never lacking subjects.

Iriwaddy Dolphins, an endangered species, near Kratie

Shy Iriwaddy Dolphins, an endangered species, near Kratie.

In the coming weeks, I will be posting photographs of the entire journey, from beginning to end. And back again.

Fisherman with net in foreground. Prapheng waterfall in back.

Fisherman with net in foreground. Prapheng Waterfall in back.

Fisherman's ladder bridge in foreground. Sophamit Waterfall in background.

Fisherman's ladder bridge in foreground. Sophamit Waterfall in background.