Leo Laksi’s Bangkok And Back

Nothing Ventured, Nothing Gained

Posts Tagged ‘street photos

Hong Kong wet market fish with Nikon fisheye lens.

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Approaching wet market from Hennesey Road.

Approaching wet market from Hennesy Road.

Whenever I visit Hong Kong, I like to stay in the Causeway Bay area for its vibrancy.  From street food to street shopping, there is plenty to do in the area.  This wet market is across the road from Times Square and is an great place to visit as evening shopping draws to a close.  Earlier in the day, it can be crowded with people which can impede one’s chances to take photos of the market’s offerings.  Just around the corner from this location are a number of high end restaurants and shops that are the modern Causeway Bay.  The market is a vestige of an earlier time that will someday disappear and become the latest skyscraper.  Enjoy while you can.

Photos were shots with a Nikon D700 and  AF Fisheye Nikkor 16mm f/2.8 lens.

Fish-eye tomatoes.

Fish-eye tomatoes.

 

Fish-eye fish.

Fish-eye fish.

Typical view at market.

Typical view at market.

Close-up.

Close-up.

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Written by leolaksi

December 27, 2010 at 5:02 pm

Too shy to photograph people on the street? Step 1

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Sweets

Sweets

Sometimes, people the world over are reluctant to take photos of strangers on the street.  There are all kinds of explanations for that reluctance.   Sure a photographer can sneak a shot but sometimes this only aggravates their feeling that they are doing something wrong.  Most of the time, my experience has been that the problem lies with the photographer’s feelings of fear of the unknown and not necessarily the subject’s reaction to having his photograph taken.  There are times when subjects may not react pleasantly and, if so, try smiling and move on.

There are a few ways for the photographer to become comfortable with street or documentary photography and that’s what I am going to discuss today.

Price of rice

Price of rice

  • Locate an area where there are plenty of people engaged in some activity.  A street fair and weekend market come to mind but think of some location with plenty of people.
  • If you are apprehensive about shooting people, shoot an activity or object as I have done in these photographs.  This is the first step.  Subjects can be less suspicious if they see you photographing activities and not them.
  • Smile and make eye contact.  Talking  to them is a good thing.  They will feel less threathened and you can end up becoming part of the scene and not an intruder.
  • If you feel the time is right, you should consider taking the shot.  If you’re uncomfortable, smile and ask them if it’s ok to take their photo.  You have nothing to lose.  If they say “no”, thank them anyway, smile, and move on.
  • If the activity is an ongoing event, attend frequently.   After a while you end up being familiar to everyone and people will be more at ease with you.  They end up recognizing you as the “camera” guy (or gal).
  • Practically every photo of people that I’ve posted on this blog is the result of this approach.  Sure, sometimes people will pose by smiling for the camera.  Others won’t.  Either way, you will become more comfortable with taking people photos.
Yes, even eggs

Yes, even eggs

These photographs were taken today at a street market that I visit about every Sunday.  The vendors have seen me so many times that they sometimes smile at me as I approach.    Most of the time, they don’t pay attention to me.  When I first visited this location, I shot photos just like the ones here.  Food, food and more food.  I talked about the food, I smiled at the food and I bought food.

Deep-fried fish

Deep-fried fish

Give this approach a try and see if it works for you.  Granted not all people and cultures are the same but you may find that this approach is universal and can be successful regardless of where you live.

Once you become more comfortable shooting people in the above manner, then you can branch out to other types of street shots.

More fish

More fish

Photographs taken with a Nikon D700 and either a Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8 or a Sigma 150mm f/2.8 macro zoom lens.

Lots of chilies

Lots of chilies

Written by leolaksi

September 13, 2009 at 6:00 pm

“Twenty-something” vendors and street fashion at Central World on Friday nights

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Vendor on phone

Vendor on phone

For the last several weeks I’ve posted about the “twenty-something” street vendors selling handicrafts and other items on Friday  in the open space in front of Central World.  In addition to “real” handicrafts, some of which are being made on the spot, and the crowds of people, this area is ground zero for interesting photographs.  There is also live music that can add to your picture-snapping enjoyment.  It’s a great place to practice your street photography.

These photos of various vendors were taken with a Nikon D700 and Nikkor 135 DC f/2 lens.

Hey, I see you.

Hey, I see you.

Waiting for the first sell.

Waiting for the first sell.

Zebra vendor

Zebra vendor

Hat woman

Hat woman

Written by leolaksi

August 21, 2009 at 7:58 pm

One night on Hong Kong’s Temple Street

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Woman in kimono

Woman in kimono

The Temple Street Night Market near Jordan  is one of the busiest and the most interesting locales in Hong Kong.  The variety of goods, from clothing to home furnishings to various trinkets is enough to keep the visitor coming back for more.  To me, it’s a great venue for photographs.  Whether its street photos or still lifes, one finds a variety that would satisfy most photographers.

All photos shot with a Nikon D700 and 85mm f/1.4 lens.

Purveyor of shoes

Purveyor of shoes

What to buy?

What to buy?

The glow of the light

The glow of the light

Bamboo steamers

Bamboo steamers

Chinese brushes with bokeh

Chinese brushes with bokeh

Written by leolaksi

August 1, 2009 at 7:00 pm